Marketing

Marketing

Globalization, even without Esperanto

A sensitive touch trumps slavish precision

Lexical exactness is not the top priority in advertising and marketing. The ‘touch and feel’ are far more important in these industries: Ideally, specialist translators will adapt texts and slogans that make your brand claim just as authentic and tangible in the cultural setting of the target country. The motto here is perfectly clear: ‘Adapt, do not copy!’

Correct localization prevents image damage

As well an extensive vocabulary, translating advertising slogans, product descriptions or marketing concepts takes the delicate touch of a safe-cracker. Not only might a linguistic faux pas leave a company with egg on its face, it can also damage a carefully nurtured image and prove hugely expensive. In many cases, this kind of mishap can only be rectified through comprehensive crisis management. The automotive industry – like many other sectors – is awash with examples of brand names that provoked unintended responses from mockery to mortification because of their meaning in other languages. Untranslated names may retain a different significance in another language. Harmless and memorable phonetic abbreviations in Germany can actually becomes words when pronounced in French – and sometimes possess dodgy meanings. To make sure this does not happen, correct localization is the alpha and omega in the marketing industry.

Over 720 specialist translators are available around the clock

We have over 720 specialist translators to cater to the marketing sector alone. All of our translators have profound experience of the industry in which they translate, and most of them also live in the target country. So they notice immediately if a brand name or slogan could be misinterpreted in other languages or cultures. Our specialist translators have a secure command of literary styles and street slang alike , which gives them the sensitivity and expertise it takes to translate your marketing texts.

Cross-media – a separate language for each medium

These days, our customers communicate their claims across a variety of media, using a dazzling array of channels to reach millions of people in just a few seconds. Each medium has its own individual style in each foreign language: a tweet – just 140 characters, which itself poses a challenge; an advertising claim – memorable and effective, but not easy to translate; a press release – informative and well-written. With each new day, our specialist translators demonstrate their deft touch for the specific linguistic requirements of each individual medium to prove time and again that they know how to communicate your marketing messages with pinpoint accuracy , whatever your channel may be.

A partner to companies and agencies

Toptranslation assists successful marketing departments in both medium-sized enterprises and global corporations. We are also a firm partner to some of the world’s most prestigious advertising and PR agencies. We are happy to manage pressing requirements or translations in exotic languages at no additional cost and without relinquishing anything of our superb quality.

Here’s what our customers in the marketing industry have to say

“This project involved producing a German translation of an English advertising slogan for a current product by Kaspersky Lab. So just translating the words would not have been sufficient. Instead it was essential to adapt the advertising claim.”

Kaspersky Labs

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